Audio Recordings

 

This page includes an audio performance from each book within The Oresteia and shows the evolution of the Chorus throughout the progression of the plays.

Recording 1: The Chorus , Agamemnon , Pg. 57

This passage is taken from page 57 of the Agamemnon and is an excellent example of the traditionally role fulfilled by the chorus. Within this speech, the chorus explains to the audience the context of the role that Helen played in the war against Troy. The speech not only fills the audience in on the role that Helen had to play but also the opinion of the chorus on the character of Helen and also the tone of the piece. The editing techniques were mainly used to create atmosphere within the piece, the beginning segment used a distorted harp to create the atmosphere of tension and unease surrounding the text being spoken. The change to the wedding noises was added to create the basis for a before and after sound montage to symbolise the loss of life in the war. This montage was therefore rounded off with the sound of barren lands to show the listener the devastating effects of the war.

 

Recording 2: Dialogue between the Nurse and the Chorus, Libation Bearers, Pg. 121- 122

We chose this dialogue from the Libation Bearers because it shows the change from the chorus being passive commentators to active participants in the narrative. In this speech the chorus tells the nurse to tell Aegisthus not to bring his bodyguards, thereby changing the course of the narrative plot.

 

Recording 3: Apollo’s speech, The Eumenides, Pg. 137

This speech is taken from Apollo. We chose to use another character to describe the chorus to symbolise the chorus becoming their own character within the narrative. This speech describes the chorus, now in the embodying the role of The Furies, in a primitive and animalistic state in which they torment Orestes for killing Clytemnestra. This animalistic form of the chorus is symbolised by the inclusion of sound effects of sleeping animals rather than humans.

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